Reply To: Late-game crisis adjustment

#19922
Wargasm
Participant

I’m not sure that it’s realistic for:

– a swarm of brigands to appear out of nowhere, a few millimetres away from you while you’re walking along a swamp path at x2 speed, just after you’ve killed a load of orcs and gained some valuable loot while also losing loads of armour that you don’t have the tools to repair
– the brigands to keep chasing you off the path into the swamp, but then (once you lose your patience and join battle) maintain a rigid unmoving defensive stance deep within the hidden reaches of the swamp, so that you either have to move laboriously through the swamp to find/attack them, or move even more laboriously in the opposite direction to retreat
– after refusing to move in the battle until you get bored and retreat, the brigands then break their defensive stance and start to rush at you headlong once again, so that there’s no escape from having to fight a tedious half-hour swamp battle in the early hours of the morning when you really need to be in bed

Even orc berserkers have been staying still and waiting for you to move on the latest release. It appears that they want you to advance because they think that one clumsy orc young with a bundle of javelins is going to snipe you all out before you can close on them. Ranged abilities may have been upgraded on 0.9.x, but not for orcs. Raiders may hit every time from 4 tiles with a height disadvantage, even if you’re in a shieldwall with a kite, but orcs miss every time from 2 tiles when you’re naked in a swamp with no shield, and they only throw one javelin per round, so that you have to endure 4 rounds of hopeless misses before the berserkers will actually advance …

If it was really realistic, you could use scouts to detect approaching enemies on the world map well in advance, and you could devise hiding places to circumvent them (there’s only around 10-20 of you, after all) …

But partly you want to play games for relief from “realism” (or at least from the tedious, time-consuming aspects of “realism”).