Topic: Undead Orcs

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  • #3604
    Malthus
    Participant

    Orcish Wieder… Fleshy Undead (German is a hard language to spell!) seems like it must ultimately be a necessity.

    Wiedergänger is the german word for the living dead. Though they could have just used the english word revenant. It also hurts my eyes when I see english speaking people writing words like wiederg a nger or zweih a nder (which simply does mean two-handed sword nothing fancy so why bother with a word they can´t even spell right?). I know your keyboard does not have ä, ö and ü. They would be simply written this way ae, oe and ue.

    "I am a Paladin!"
    >OMG, Malthus, there are no damn paladins in Battle Brothers...<
    "OK, OK! Then I´m a wrecked down minstrel drunkard pretending to be a paladin, singing so wrong in the midst of battle that even the undead run in fear... Better?!"

    #3615
    Jago
    Participant

    Sometimes I wonder if English-speaking people like to use German words in RPGs because it sounds exotic. The same way companies in Germany adopt English terms and slogans for their products, because it sounds fancy and modern.

    It also hurts my eyes when I see english speaking people writing words like wiederg a nger or zweih a nder (which simply does mean two-handed sword nothing fancy so why bother with a word they can´t even spell right?).

    Maybe it’s more interesting for English-speaker? Worry not, it’ll be “fixed” in the German localization. ;)

    #3617
    Alesch
    Participant

    Sometimes I wonder if English-speaking people like to use German words in RPGs because it sounds exotic. The same way companies in Germany adopt English terms and slogans for their products, because it sounds fancy and modern.

    Exoticism is a major reason that english speakers use foreign words, yes. No on in their right mind would pay 10$ for grilled flat bread with melted cheese inside, but if you call it a quesadilla (I cannot spell the word) and suddenly it’s a “cultural experience”. That said, sometimes it really is a matter of the english language not having a similar word, but in this case we usually just steal it wholesale and make it an english word. English is a bastard language, after all.

    Revenant, for instance, is just the french verb for returning. It’s been an english word for ages now, but it was certainly stolen (adopted would probably be a better word, given how heavily french influenced english) initially. I find the history of english words to be very interesting, honestly.

    The difference between “ask”, and “demand” for instance, comes from the relationship between the Saxons and their Norman rulers. “Demand” is (with some spelling differences, perhaps?) the french word for request. Both “ask” and “demand” essentially mean the same thing, with the difference between them being mostly in the insinuated relationship between the requester and the requestee. A Saxon would “ask” another Saxon for something, while a Norman would “demand” it. Saying no to the Norman wasn’t really an option, even if he was being very polite. :P

    #3626
    Malthus
    Participant

    Sometimes I wonder if English-speaking people like to use German words in RPGs because it sounds exotic. The same way companies in Germany adopt English terms and slogans for their products, because it sounds fancy and modern.

    Yes, that´s right but all too often they overdo it with anglicisms or doing it totally wrong. Could you guess what a Back-Shop is? xD
    Also many older people who didn´t learn english in school have problems with this development as they don´t understand anything.

    Maybe it’s more interesting for English-speaker? Worry not, it’ll be “fixed” in the German localization. 😉

    I don´t really need a german localization as I understand english quite well. Speaking and writing in english on the other hand is an other story ;)

    Sometimes I wonder if English-speaking people like to use German words in RPGs because it sounds exotic. The same way companies in Germany adopt English terms and slogans for their products, because it sounds fancy and modern.

    Exoticism is a major reason that english speakers use foreign words, yes. No on in their right mind would pay 10$ for grilled flat bread with melted cheese inside, but if you call it a quesadilla (I cannot spell the word) and suddenly it’s a “cultural experience”. That said, sometimes it really is a matter of the english language not having a similar word, but in this case we usually just steal it wholesale and make it an english word. English is a bastard language, after all.

    Revenant, for instance, is just the french verb for returning. It’s been an english word for ages now, but it was certainly stolen (adopted would probably be a better word, given how heavily french influenced english) initially. I find the history of english words to be very interesting, honestly.

    The difference between “ask”, and “demand” for instance, comes from the relationship between the Saxons and their Norman rulers. “Demand” is (with some spelling differences, perhaps?) the french word for request. Both “ask” and “demand” essentially mean the same thing, with the difference between them being mostly in the insinuated relationship between the requester and the requestee. A Saxon would “ask” another Saxon for something, while a Norman would “demand” it. Saying no to the Norman wasn’t really an option, even if he was being very polite. 😛

    Interchaning words between languages is a normal thing. Not normal is the speed at which this happens right now which is a symptom of the ongoing globalization I think.

    And I found your explanation about the origin of these words quite interesting.

    "I am a Paladin!"
    >OMG, Malthus, there are no damn paladins in Battle Brothers...<
    "OK, OK! Then I´m a wrecked down minstrel drunkard pretending to be a paladin, singing so wrong in the midst of battle that even the undead run in fear... Better?!"

    #3708
    GOD
    Participant

    Wiedergänger is the german word for the living dead. Though they could have just used the english word revenant. It also hurts my eyes when I see english speaking people writing words like wiederg a nger or zweih a nder (which simply does mean two-handed sword nothing fancy so why bother with a word they can´t even spell right?). I know your keyboard does not have ä, ö and ü. They would be simply written this way ae, oe and ue.

    Ahhh, I move around too much. My German’s getting rusty. :( Obviously it should have been a ä and not a ï, having to memorise that was a pain. Speaking lots of languages has its downsides.
    Part of why the English speaking world often uses German words in media as an exotic word, is because it sounds serious and harsh because of having sounds that English does not have. I’ve been told by Americans that Germans sound extremely angry to their ears when conversing amongst each other, it’s quite funny actually.

    #3721
    Malthus
    Participant

    This is how russians sound to us. They can greet each other nicely but you would think they are having an argument ;)

    "I am a Paladin!"
    >OMG, Malthus, there are no damn paladins in Battle Brothers...<
    "OK, OK! Then I´m a wrecked down minstrel drunkard pretending to be a paladin, singing so wrong in the midst of battle that even the undead run in fear... Better?!"

    #3725
    NewAgeOfPower
    Participant

    Holy s***.

    ‘God’ has a good ideal.

    What is coming to this world?

    #3729
    Alesch
    Participant

    I always thought that german and russian sounding angry to english speakers had less to do with the actual sounds in the languages and more to do with the fact that germans and russians have been portrayed as villains in Hollywood for… almost as long as there’s been a film industry. World War 2 and the Cold War. Thinking about it now though, and I think GOD might be right (I feel dirty saying that).

    After all, german is a guttural language compared to english, at least from my (limited) experience with it. Russian… might be? I don’t really know. What I do know is that a great many of english’s most impactful curse words also carry very guttural vowel sounds. I’m not sure what the board’s stance on cursing is, so I won’t put up a list. Suffice to say that many are four letter words with a U in the middle.

    Then again, it might be the Hollywood thing.

    #3730
    Malthus
    Participant

    I don´t think you have to feel dirty for saying this. Maybe Hollywood wanted to give that impression as it is not only a film producing factory but also a propaganda machinery.

    But when it comes to foreign languages the more they differ from our own and the less we are used to them the more alien they sound to us. This leads to misinterpretations. I do have some friends who come from former Sovjet Union states. They almost lived their whole life in germany. You would not notice where they come from. But as their parents spoke russian in the first place and usually have a bit more problems learning a new language their german is not as well. So they do speak russian at home. And from my point of view every littly small talk sounds like an argument. Mostly because of the lack of understanding as I only know a few words in russian. Many americans might have similar problems with the german language for the same reason.

    "I am a Paladin!"
    >OMG, Malthus, there are no damn paladins in Battle Brothers...<
    "OK, OK! Then I´m a wrecked down minstrel drunkard pretending to be a paladin, singing so wrong in the midst of battle that even the undead run in fear... Better?!"

    #3732
    Holy.Death
    Participant

    The reason why people are not using special words (such as “ä”) is because for the non-native speakers it’s a pain to find language-specific virtual keyboard just for something that can be suplemented with standard “a”. It’s same cutting corners as in any other language.

    #3733
    GOD
    Participant

    You wound me with your blasphemy. No respect for your local deity.

    It´s partially the unfamiliar, guttural sounds and partially that when they do hear Russian or German it´s usually spoken by bad guys in movies. I can´t even remember the last movie where the people speaking Russian or German where not in some way supposed to be intimidating. It wouldn´t surprise me though if they do it intentionally to ensure that foreign movies still feel foreign to English speaking audiences, so that less people watch them. Less competition that way.

    #3746
    Sky
    Participant

    Haha, it’s just soo funny seein people torn apart with the sentences they write refering to forum user named GOD while at the same time these sentences sound as if they mean the church god.

    Here, have a nice day!

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